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Sharon-Marie Weldon

I am a registered nurse who gained a Bachelor of Science in Nursing at the University of Chester. During this time I achieved an award for excellence in clinical practice, was part of the curriculum revalidation board, and co-wrote and produced a unique prospectus DVD for the University’s admissions department.

My first nursing post was as a scrub and circulating theatre practitioner within a London based emergency and trauma centre. This was a challenging and exciting role for my first nursing job. Due to the variety of the work involved and the importance of team work, I gained extremely valuable skills that have proved invaluable to me ever since.

As a student nurse I developed a passion for infectious diseases which took me to Uganda on a nursing elective placement. I had always hoped to pursue this interest and therefore I left theatres to join a specialist infectious disease unit, based at another central London hospital.

Whilst working on the unit I was seconded to the hospital’s TB clinic to ensure the service would continue as normal during a large staff turnover, this is where I developed an in-depth knowledge of Tuberculosis (TB). At this time I commenced an MSc in public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; it was here that my interest in research grew.

I returned to the infectious disease unit once the secondment was completed and realised that I had enjoyed concentrating on a specific area of health. This found me wanting to combine the TB knowledge I had gained and my desire to learn more about research; an opportunity with the Health Protection Agency (HPA) facilitated this. This post was a clinical research role and saw the recruitment of participants and the collection of data and blood samples for TB research. This was conducted across several London-based hospital sites as part of the PREDICT study.  http://predictstudy.org.uk/

Qualitative research had always been of interest to me and is particularly dominant within nursing practice. Therefore when the ‘Transient Teams in the Operating Theatre’ project was advertised it was an exciting opportunity to combine my interest in research and qualitative studies, as well as to utilise the skills I have gained during my time as a theatre practitioner.

In recent times I have completes an MSC in Public Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical medicine and have commenced a PhD at Imperial College London which addresses the design, creation and evaluation of clinical sequential simulation.

Publications:
Korkiakangas, T., Weldon, S-M., Bezemer, J.,& Kneebone, R. (2014). Nurse–surgeon object transfer: Video analysis of communication and situation awareness in the operating theatre. International Journal of Nursing Studies,  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2014.01.007

Weldon, S-M., Harris, A., Bello., & Kneebone, R. (2013). A Centenary of Portable Operating Theatres [your view to – A Portable Operating Theatre]. 1 (1), P. 145-149.http://www.bjs.co.uk/details/yourviews/956685/A-portable-operation-theatre-.html

Weldon, S-M., Korkiakangas, T., Bezemer, J., & Kneebone, R. (2013). Communication in the operating theatre: A systematic literature review of observational research. British Journal of Surgery, 100 (13), P. 1677-1688 http://www.bjs.co.uk/details/article/5520351/Communication-in-the-operating-theatre-.html 

Weldon S-M, Korkiakangas T, Bezemer J, et al., 2012, Video Analysis of Bodily Conduct in Teamwork within the Operating Theatre, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF QUALITATIVE METHODS, Vol:11, ISSN:1609-4069, Pages:895-896

Weldon, S., Korkiakangas, T., Bezemer, J., Kneebone, R., Nicholson, K., & Kress, G. (2012). Transient Teams in the Operating Theatre. The Operating Theatre Journal; 261 (1), P.2   http://www.otjonline.com/

Weldon, S. (2009). Difference matters when respecting diversity. Nursing Standard, 23(23), P.61 http://nursingstandard.rcnpublishing.co.uk/students/clinical-placements/placement-advice/placements-abroad/difference-matters-when-respecting-diversity

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